Julie Peterson, LISW

Do I Really Need Counseling?

In my practice, I work with clients who struggle with self-doubt, embarrassment, anxiety, depression, isolation, helplessness, or a lack of confidence. If you have any of these feelings, it may be a sign that you want something to change, but you may not know how to make that change happen.

Many people wait months, or even years, before finally seeking help. Seeking help doesn’t mean failure – it means quite the opposite. Seeking help takes courage, and it’s a critical step toward addressing negative feelings

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You can improve your wellbeing by getting the right help. That means working with a professional therapist who knows how to approach your challenges, and most importantly, can provide the right tools and coping skills. With the right therapist, you can overcome your challenges and rebuild confidence.

Issues I Can Help You With

My Style of Therapy

“Before you assist others, put your oxygen mask on first.” Prioritizing your wellness is essential. Perhaps you feel pulled in a million directions or you have suffered a loss. Perhaps you are stuck in an unhealthy relationship or you constantly compare yourself to others. Breaking unhealthy thought cycles can be life-changing, and that is what we will strive to do in our work together.

We will work collaboratively to achieve your goals. We will continue to build on your strengths, and develop coping skills and strategies to deal with the challenges of day-to-day life.

As a Licensed Independent Social Worker, I strive to create a relaxed, empathetic and healing environment. I understand the importance of meeting clients where they are in their journey. Some of my therapeutic styles include narrative, solution focused, CBT, Gottman, mindfulness and spirituality.

Grief and Loss

The worst loss is your loss. Losing a spouse, a child, or a loved one is one of most painful and traumatizing experiences. Life has been upended by this loss but, at the same time, you’re dealing with your grief. You feel like other parts of life are empty or there’s a hole inside of you that can’t be filled. You don’t know what to do or how to deal with it. Others have told you or implied that you are stuck. Feelings or expressions of grief are often diminished and those in mourning are left with feelings of shame, isolation and abandonment. You want to get better but don’t know how.

Dealing with your grief is overwhelming, confusing, and painful all at once. We will all experience grief and loss at some point in our lives and mourning the loss of someone or something can be a challenge in today’s culture.

Together, we will explore your grief and help you along the journey of mourning your loss. We will discuss the stages of grief outlined by some of the top grief experts, such as David Kessler and Dr. Alan Wolfelt, as well as some techniques to best assist you on this journey.

Over time, you will begin to feel more empowered to speak to others about your loss and will begin to recognize the importance of celebrating the ‘little wins’ of the day. Whether you are mourning the loss of a spouse, child, pet, or career, we can work together to heal.

Relationship Issues

The question couples frequently ask themselves goes something like this: “How can we stop fighting and start feeling like we did when we first met?” When couples ponder this question, the suggestions are endless. Communicate better? Rediscover our passion? Date night?

Paradoxically, marriage experts Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott, answer this question by saying that each partner must focus on themselves first and foremost. This philosophy is based on the notion that relationships are only as healthy as each person is individually, whether it is emotional or physical health.

Together, we will use tools provided by Drs. Les and Leslie Parrot, as well as Drs. John and Julie Gottman, to pinpoint areas of strength and growth to better your relationship. For example, I will help you to recognize and stop repeating what Gottman calls the ‘Four Horsemen of Relationship Conflict’: criticism, contempt, stonewalling, and defensiveness. 

As sessions continue, each of you will begin to have a better idea of how to best show love to your partner, communicate with them, and disagree with them. You will better identify each other’s dreams and goals and find a deeper connection with one another.